8.30.2006

Thoreau's Journal: 30-Aug-1856

How happens it that we reverence the stones which fall from another planet, and not the stones which belong to this,—another globe, not this,—heaven, and not earth? Are not the stones in Hodge’s wall as good as the aerolite at Mecca? Is not our broad back-door-stone as good as any corner-stone in heaven?

It would imply the regeneration of mankind, if they were to become elevated enough to truly worship stocks and stones. It is the sentiment of fear and slavery and habit which makes a heathenish idolatry. Such idolaters abound in all countries, and heathen cross the seas to reform heathens, dead to bury the dead, and all go down to the pit together. If I could, I would worship the parings of my nails. If he who makes two blades of grass grow where one grew before is a benefactor, he who discovers two gods where there was only known the one (and such a one!)_ before is a still greater benefactor. I would fain improve every opportunity to wonder and worship, as a sunflower welcomes the light. The more thrilling, wonderful, divine objects I behold in a day, the more expanded and immortal I become. If a stone appeals to me and elevates me, tells me how many miles I have come, how many remain to travel,—and to the more, the better,— reveals the future to me in some measure, it is a matter of private rejoicing. If it did the same service to all, it might well be a matter of public rejoicing.

2 comments:

Adam said...

Greg, what you are doing here is absolutely great. I have mentioned your/Henry's blog several times here and there on the www. The idea of a HDT blog was brilliant.

I just have one small complaint. The black background. Reading white letters on a black screen is well, it puts my brain in reverse or something.

Otherwise very happy with this blog.

Guillermo Ruiz said...

I am a follower of this blog and I translate some entries and works to Spanish.
It is a happy coincidence that a posted on August 30 the spanih version of Thoreau's poem Ah, 'is in vain the peaceful din containign the verse:

"The men who stood on yonder height
That day are long since gone;
Not the same hand directs the fight
And monumental stone."
http://thoreaucastellano.blogspot.com