6.17.2005

Thoreau's Journal: 17-Jun-1854

Another remarkably hazy day: our view is confined, the horizon near, no mountains; as you look off only four or five miles, you see a succession of dark wooded ridges and vales filled with mist. It is dry, hazy June weather. We are more of the earth, farther from heaven, these days. We live in a grosser element. We [are] getting deeper into the mists of earth. Even the birds sing with less vigor and vivacity. The season of hope and promise is past; already the season of small fruits has arrived. The Indians marked the midsummer as the season when berries were ripe. We are a little saddened, because we begin to see the interval between our hopes and their fulfillment. The prospect of the heavens is taken away, and we are presented with a few small berries.

4 comments:

The Complimenting Commenter said...

A very cool post and blog. I love the idea of bringing the old into the new technology. Nice job.

Greg said...

Thanks for the compliment.

ACM said...

wonderful indeed, "the season of small fruits"...

Greg said...

Henry does have a way with descriptions, doesnt he?